WPC 2015

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World Puzzle Championship 2015 was held in Sofia, Bulgaria. The competition took place between the 15th and 17th of October. The individual winner was Ken Endo (Japan). The team winner was the team of Germany (Ulrich Voigt, Florian Kirch, Robert Vollmert, Philipp Weiß).

The championship was directed by Deyan Razsadov. Puzzles were mostly written by Andrey Bogdanov (Russia) and Vladimir Portugalov (Belarus), with the help of Svetlozar Stefanov (Bulgaria), Anton Titov (Bulgaria), Gabriele Simionato (Italy), Masatoshi Kengo (Japan), Minako Sakai (Japan), Kazunori Saitoh (Japan), Hns Eendebak (Netherlands), Olga Leontyeva (Russia), Tawan Sunathvanichkul (Thailand) and Whit McMahan (USA).

General Rules[edit]

From IB.

Scoring and Bonuses[edit]

Points will be awarded only for fully and correctly solved puzzles. There will be no partial credit unless explicitly stated in a round’s description.

  • Individual Rounds: A bonus of 10 points for each full remaining minute will be awarded to any competitor who correctly solves each puzzle in a round. At the judge’s discretion, 0.75 x bonus (rounded to a whole number) will be awarded in the case of a single minor mistake in no more than 1 puzzle. For the avoidance of doubt, a minor mistake is considered at most two incorrectly filled cells in at most one of the puzzles.
  • Team Rounds: A bonus of 40 points for each full remaining minute will be awarded to any team who correctly solves all the puzzles in a round. If there are any mistakes, then no bonus will be awarded.

Playoffs[edit]

The top 10 competitors from the individual competition will qualify for the play-offs. This is broken into three rounds. The format of each round is a set of puzzles that were previously encountered in the tournament.

Play-offs competitors will solve as per previous rounds on desks. Each puzzle will be taped centrally to the desk and will be filmed by a camera for relay to spectators.

The first round will feature competitors who finished in positions 7-10, with staggered starts determined by points’ differences, as defined below. The winner of the first round, ’A’, will progress into the second round along with competitors who finished in positions 4-6. ’A’ will have a staggered start as determined by the 7th place competitor.

Similarly, the winner of the second round, ’B’, will progress into the third and final round, and play against competitors who finished in positions 1-3. ’B’ will have a staggered start as determined by the position of the 4th place competitor. This round will determine the podium places for the 24th World Puzzle Championship.

Staggered Starts[edit]

Given S1, S2, ..., S10 are the point scores of the top 10 competitors, and B = 600 / (S1 - S10):

  • The staggered start, in seconds, for competitor i in the first round is B(S7 - Si).
  • The staggered start, in seconds, for competitor i in the second round is B(S4 - Si).
  • The staggered start, in seconds, for competitor i in the third round is B(S1 - Si).

(There were no team playoffs.)

Contest Details[edit]

Some of the names of the rounds (10, 12, 13) were different from those presented in the instruction booklet! 10 was "Not Quite Classics" in the IB, 12 "Assorted", and 13 "Domino".

Day 1[edit]

Day 2[edit]

Day 3[edit]