List of Easy as variants

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This page lists Easy as variant that has appeared on the WPCs. Most puzzles involving letters or numbers can be combined with Easy as rules.

BACA[edit]

BACA Example.png BACA Example Solution.png

Invented by Serkan Yürekli (Turkey) in 2009. First appeared in the 2nd Oğuz Atay Puzzle Contest.[1] Hybrid with Paint by Numbers puzzle.

Blacken some cells and then place a single letter into every empty cell such that each of the letters ‘A’, ‘B’, and ‘C’ appears exactly once in each row and each column. Some cells already contain a letter; these cells must either be left alone or blackened (which removes that letter from the cell). The letters outside the grid indicate the first letter that can be seen in the respective row or column from the respective direction. When numbers are given to the left of (and above) the main grid, they represent the lengths of all the contiguous blackened cell blocks in the corresponding row (or column). The lengths are given in order from left to right (or top to bottom), and cell blocks must contain at least one unblackened cell between them.

(Rules and example (A-C) from PGP IB)

First or Last[edit]

Easy as First or Last Example.png Easy as First or Last Example Solution.png

First appeared on 2011 Indian Nationals. [2] Author of the puzzle was Deb Mohanty (India).

Place letters of the specified list into some cells, no more than one letter per cell, so that each letter appears exactly once in each row and column. The letters outside the grid indicate the first letter or the last letter seen from that direction in the corresponding row or column.

(Example (A-C) from WPC 2017 IB)

No First[edit]

Easy as No First Example.png Easy as No First Example Solution.png

Seen on WPC 2012/Part 4 but most probably predates it, especially because the puzzle was hexagonal.

Place letters of the specified list into some cells, no more than one letter per cell, so that each letter appears exactly once in each row and column. The letters outside the grid indicate the first letter that cannot be seen in the respective row or column from the respective direction.

(Example (A-C) from WPC 2018 IB)

Myopia[edit]

Myopia Easy as Example.png Myopia Easy as Example Solution.png

First appeared on WPC 2016/Round 10, a Myopia-related variant round. The author of the puzzle was Matej Uher (Slovakia).

Place letters of the specified list into some cells, no more than one letter per cell, so that each letter appears exactly once in each row and column. The letters outside the grid indicate the first letter seen from that direction in the corresponding row or column.

The arrows point at all of the closest cells with a letter in the corresponding direction. The cells with arrows are considered invisible and no letter can be placed in a cell with an arrow.

(Example (A-C) from WPC 2016 IB)

Inner ABC[edit]

Inner ABC Example.png Inner ABC Example Solution.png

Despite appearing on WPC 2018/Round 12, an "Innovatives" round, 2017 Czech Nationals include one instance of this puzzle.[3] The author was probably Jiří Hrdina (Czech Rep.).

Place letters of the specified list into some cells, no more than one letter per cell, so that each letter appears exactly once in each row and column. The letters in gray cells indicate the letters that are visible from the given cell both horizontally and vertically. Only the first letter in each of the 4 directions are visible. Gray cells are invisible and can be seen through.

(Example (A-C) from 2017 Czech Nationals IB)

ABC Letter Groups[edit]

ABC Letter Groups Example.png ABC Letter Groups Example Solution.png

First appeared on WPC 2018/Round 12. The puzzle author was Jiří Hrdina.

Place letters given set of letters into some white cells, no more than one letter per cell, so that each letter appears exactly once in each row and column. Some cells may remain empty. Groups of letters on top and on the left indicate the order in which the letters appear in the given row or column (not necessarily next to each other).

(Example (A-C) from WPC 2018 IB)

ILX[edit]

ILX Example.png ILX Example Solution.png

First appeared on WPC 2018/Round 12. The puzzle author was Jiří Hrdina (Czech Rep.). Can be seen as a hybrid between ABC Letter Groups and Dutch Loop.

Rules: Place either I, L or X to the cells so that each letter appears exactly once in each row and column. Groups of letters outside are the same as ABC Letter Groups with letters I, L and X. At the same time, draw a loop that vertically and horizontally travels all cells that aren't shaded nor with X. Loop must go straight on cells with I and must turn on cells with L.

(Example from WPC 2018 IB)

Easy as Word Snake[edit]

See List of Snake variants#Easy as Word Snake.

Appearances in the past WPCs[edit]

References[edit]